"When people of colour are expected to educate white people as to their humanity, when women are expected to educate men, lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world, the oppressors maintain their position and evade their responsibility for their own actions."

— Audre Lorde. (via theblacksophisticate)

(Source: , via poetryasillumination)

"

If white American feminist theory need not deal with the differences between us, and the resulting difference in our oppressions, then how do you deal with the fact that the women who clean your houses and tend your children while you attend conferences on feminist theory are, for the most part, poor women and women of Color?

What is the theory behind racist feminism?

"

— Audre Lorde, “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House,” 1984 (via ethiopienne)

(Source: owning-my-truth, via loveyourchaos)

"The true focus of revolutionary change is never merely the oppressive situations which we seek to escape, but that piece of the oppressor which is planted deep within each of us, and which knows only the oppressors’ tactics, the oppressors’ relationships."

— Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference” (via amazonfeminist)

(via flamingculture)

"You cannot use someone else’s fire; you can only use your own. And in order to do that, you must first be willing to believe you have it."

— Audre Lorde (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via cuntofdoom)

"Whenever the need for some pretence of communication arises, those who profit from our oppression call upon us to share our knowledge with them. In other words, it is the responsibility of the oppressed to teach the oppressors their mistakes. I am responsible for educating teachers who dismiss my children’s culture in school. Black and third world people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade responsibility for their own actions. There is a constant drain of energy which might be better used in redefining ourselves and devising realistic scenarios for altering the present and constructing the future."

— Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference”, in Sister Outsider, page 114-115. (via fucknokyriarchy)

(Source: , via hciwrc)

"Change means growth, and growth can be painful"

— Audre Lorde (via @Anti_Intellect on twitter) 

(Source: twitter.com)

"

Some women wait for themselves
Around the next corner
And call the empty spot peace
But the opposite of living
Is only not living
And the stars do not care.

Some women wait for something
To change and nothing
Does change
So they change

Themselves.

"

Audre Lorde (via nezua)

(Source: jadalyric, via heavenrants)

"There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives."

— Audre Lorde (via womens-words)

(via feministisnotadirtyword)

"When I speak of change…I am speaking of a basic and radical alteration of those assumptions underlying our lives."

— Audre Lorde 

(Source: twitter.com)

"

To the white women present who recognize these attitudes as familiar, but most of all, to all my sisters of Color who live and survive thousands of such encounters - to my sisters of Color who like me still tremble their rage under harness, or who sometimes question the expression of our rage as useless and disruptive (the two most popular accusations) - I want to speak about anger, my anger and what I have learned from my travels through its dominions.

Every woman has a well-stocked arsenal of anger potentially useful against those oppressions, personal and institutional, which brought that anger into being. Focused with precision it can be become a powerful source of energy serving serving progress and change. And when I speak of change, I do not mean a simple switch of positions or a temporary lessening of tensions, nor the ability to smile and feel good. I am speaking of a basic and radical alteration of those assumptions underlying our lives.

"

— Audre Lorde. “The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism” Sister Outsider. Crossing Press Berkley. 1984. Originally published as the keynote presentation at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference, Storrs, Connecticut, June 1981 (via sproutedink)

(via becauseiamawoman)

"

To the white women present who recognize these attitudes as familiar, but most of all, to all my sisters of Color who live and survive thousands of such encounters - to my sisters of Color who like me still tremble their rage under harness, or who sometimes question the expression of our rage as useless and disruptive (the two most popular accusations) - I want to speak about anger, my anger and what I have learned from my travels through its dominions.

Every woman has a well-stocked arsenal of anger potentially useful against those oppressions, personal and institutional, which brought that anger into being. Focused with precision it can be become a powerful source of energy serving serving progress and change. And when I speak of change, I do not mean a simple switch of positions or a temporary lessening of tensions, nor the ability to smile and feel good. I am speaking of a basic and radical alteration of those assumptions underlying our lives.

"

— Audre Lorde. “The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism” Sister Outsider. Crossing Press Berkley. 1984. Originally published as the keynote presentation at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference, Storrs, Connecticut, June 1981 (via sproutedink)

(via sisteroutsider)

"Rape is on the increase, reported and unreported, and rape is not aggressive sexuality, it is sexualized aggression. As Kalamu ya Salaam, a Black male writer points out, “As long as male domination exists, rape will exist. Only women revolting and men made conscious of their responsibility to fight sexism can collectively stop rape.”"

Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference”, Sister Outsider (via yukiesano)

(via rapeculturerealities)

"The failure of academic feminists to recognize difference as a crucial strength is a failure to reach beyond the first patriarchal lesson. In our world, divide and conquer must become define and empower."

Audre Lorde  (via julinkah)

Preach.

(via sisteroutsider)

(via thepersonalispolitic)

"

I wish to raise a Black man who will not be destroyed by, nor settle for, those corruptions called power by the white fathers who mean his destruction as surely as they mean mine. I wish to raise a Black man who will recognize that the legitimate objets of his hostility are not women, but the particulars of a structure that programs him to fear and despise women as well as his own black self.

For me, this task begins with teaching my son that I do not exist to do his feeling for him.

"

— Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider, “Man Child”. The essay “Man Child” was originally published in 1979 in Conditions: Four (via sproutedink)

(via sonofbaldwin)