"Look, you’re a feminist who, in this particular case, made the non-feminist choice. That’s all. I assume it was the right choice for you, or you wouldn’t have done it, and that’s fine! But feminism is not, in fact, all about choosing your choice. It is mostly about recognizing when things are fucked up for women at the societal level, and talking about that, and trying to change it. So sometimes, even when a decision is right for you, you still need to recognize that you made that decision within a social context that overwhelmingly supports your choice, and punishes women who make a different one."

Why I Lose My Mind Every Time We Have the Name Conversation | Kate Harding (via brute-reason)

(via wretchedoftheearth)

"The trend of labeling women “crazy” is part of the culture that socializes women to go along to get along. When women are told over and over again that they’re not allowed to feel the way they feel and that they’re being “unreasonable” or “oversensitive”, they’re conditioned to not trust their own emotions. Their behavior – being assertive, even demanding or standing up for how they feel – becomes an “inconvenience” to men and they’re taught not to give offense and to consider the feelings of others before their own."

On Labeling Women “Crazy” | Paging Dr. NerdLove - Part 2 (via brutereason)

(via seananmcguire)

"My mistrust [of men] is not, as one might expect, primarily a result of the violent acts done on my body, nor the vicious humiliations done to my dignity. It is, instead, born of the multitude of mundane betrayals that mark my every relationship with a man—the casual rape joke, the use of a female slur, the careless demonization of the feminine in everyday conversation, the accusations of overreaction, the eye rolling and exasperated sighs in response to polite requests to please not use misogynist epithets in my presence."

(via nadiaaboulhosn)

#i have a hard time dating men because i have a hard time believing men respect me

(via underwaternow)

Pretty much. 

(via fuckingrapeculture)

(Source: shakesville.com, via war-on-women-is-real)

"Feminism is not about who opens the jar.

It is not about who pays for the date. It is not about who moves the couch. It is not about who kills the bugs. It is not about who cooks the dinner. It’s not even about who stays home with the kids, as long as the decision was made together, after thinking carefully about your situation and coming to an agreement that makes sense for your particular marriage and family.

It is about making sure that nobody ever has to do anything by “default” because of their gender. The stronger person should move the couch. The person who enjoys cooking more, has more time for it, and/or is better at it should do the cooking. Sometimes the stronger person is male, sometimes not. Sometimes the person who is best suited for cooking is female, sometimes not. You should do what works.

But it is also about letting people know that it is okay to change. If you’re a woman who wants to become stronger, that’s great. If you’re a man who wants to learn how to cook, that’s also great. You might start out with a relationship where the guy opens all the jars and the girl cooks all the meals, but you might find that you want to try something else. So try it."

4 ignorant delusions people have about feminism (via brutereason)

(via bematthe)

Tags: feminism

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

deltaqoodrem:

Michelle Rodriguez laying down truths
[x]

That third gif also sums up the reason why so many queer women in fiction get treated like shit and why we barely get acknowledged as existing at all

These pathetic excuses for writers have no idea how to write a woman who doesn’t want to fuck a man

(via hellyeahfeminism)

"Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night."

Sylvia Plath

fuck every single time that last line gets quoted without the rest

(via sadjailbait)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via flamingculture)

guiltyhipster:

Girls get mocked for liking high heels and lipstick. Girls get mocked for liking sports. Girls get mocked for liking tea and books. Girls get mocked for liking comics books and video games. Girls get mocked for liking math and science. Girls get mocked for liking boys. Girls get mocked for liking girls. Girls get mocked for liking both. What the fuck are we supposed to like? Water? Air? Come on, tell me. I’m dying to know. 

(via flamingculture)

"Collective movements for social justice do not gain traction through niceness. American women did not gain the right to vote by skipping down Pennsylvania Avenue while whistling cute songs about suffrage: they picketed, they marched, they yelled, they were arrested. Abusive partners and rapists will not be stopped by women having heart-to-hearts with their violators over coffee, because ghosts cannot talk and broken fingers cannot lift a latte. The patriarchy cannot be shattered by good vibes. In order to bring about change, old and oppressive structures must be destroyed. Destruction is not negative if what will grow from the rubble is something that will create a safer, healthier, stronger society."

Feminism is Not “The F Word” — Seventh Grove

Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer said she doesn’t identify as a feminist because feminism is “too negative.” Here’s what I have to say about that…

(via forevercemetery)

broken fingers cannot lift a latte is going to stick with me.

(via flatbear)

(Source: drakeboner, via flamingculture)

"There’s all these songs about loving a girl who doesn’t know she’s beautiful. But what about loving a girl that does? How come liking myself makes me less appealing?"

— My 12 year old cousin is actually pretty deep (via imjust-a-girl)

(via lipstick-feminists)

"These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize."

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

(via bematthe)

"Miss A’s clothes represent her. It’s impossible to overstate how significant this is for a female superhero. The costumes of male superheroes have always been powerful tools for making and owning the self; their colours, contours and crests proudly declare their mission, identity, and powers, transforming them into walking advertisements for themselves, capturing in the sleek simplicity of iconography a snapshot of what the hero can do, where he’s been, and what he aspires to become. Historically, this has been far less true of the costumes of female superheroes. Often derived from the costumes of male superheroes and/or prioritizing skin and cleavage at the expense of character, the costumes of female superheroes tend to lack deep meaning and individuality. Too often, the way female superheroes are dressed (and of course, the way they’re drawn), makes them more of a thing to have than a person to be; too often, female superheroes are vehicles of objectification, rather than identification."

Diceratops does a lovely article about Miss America Chavez’s style which I’m afraid to forward to Jamie in case his head explodes. Though, I suppose that at least would be very WicDiv. I almost quoted the last three paragraphs, but I don’t want to take the climax away from Anna’s prose. (via kierongillen)

(via bematthe)

"

The sexual exploitation of women is especially predominant in advertising, which is impossible to escape because ads are omnipresent. Thin, barely clothed bodies appear in magazines and on the backs of buses. Intimate close-up shots of smoky bedroom eyes belonging to a woman wearing only lace negligee stare down at passerby from high billboards. Pelvic shots and chiseled bodies come through the television and the computer. They are in every clothing store and adorn the pages of weekly sales circulars.

The mechanism used in these ads is quite simple: Attractive bodies are employed to grab attention and simulate desire, which advertisers hope will then be transferred to the product. Buy the beer, get the girl. In this way, women’s bodies are equated with commodities, presented as rewards of consumption. By instructing men to regard women’s bodies as objects, ads help create an atmosphere that devalues women as people, encourages sexual harassment, and worse (Jacobson and Mazur 1995:84).

Often times the women portrayed in these ads are not even whole. The pictures show only legs, torsos, or an open mouth with rouge lip color provocatively placed atop a glass bottle. This reduces women to collections of parts, something less than human. This objectification and sexploitation has changed the rules of society and along with it the attitudes of men and women have changed.

Just as simple films relying on crude jokes and violence are perfect for the global marketplace, since they require little translation, so is advertising that relies entirely on image. Bare breasts and phallic symbols are understood everywhere. As are the nude female buttocks featured in the Italian and German ads for similar worthless products to remedy the imaginary problem of cellulite. Unfortunately, such powerful imagery of[ten] pollutes the cultural environment (Kilbourne 1999:72).

"

The Objectification of Women in Mass Media: Female Self-Image in Misogynist Culture, The New York Sociologist, Vol. 5, 2010, by Stephanie Nicholl Berberick, University at Buffalo

(via socio-logic)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via bematthe)

"And this gets to the root of the fear, right here. When you walk around in the world as a woman, you get this creepy feeling oftentimes that men really do just think of you as a thing, an object, as meat. You’re just there to fuck, or to hang out with so he can get status from other guys. You see these images of how women who are valued are supposed to look, and you see that you don’t look that way, and you wonder if that means you have no value. You get the feeling that you could be a Pulitzer Prize winning astronaut billionaire who cured cancer, and you’d still have a bunch of guys trolling your comments saying, fuck you, I’ll just rape you, and what will you be then, bitch? Because sexual violence is how you control women, how you put them in their place, how you maintain your own dominance. For the guy in this film to actually say it out loud, to give voice to that terrible fear that so many of us have, was actually kind of cathartic for me. “You’re no different than that thing in the cellar.”"

“You’re No Different Than That Thing in the Cellar”: Thoughts on “The Woman” | Kameron Hurley
Spoilers for “The Woman” which I haven’t seen, but interesting…

I also still disagree with her in regard to The Cabin in the Woods, still, very interesting blog.

(via ecnef)

(via ecnef)